Monthly Archives: February 2014

Anxiety in Dogs

iStock-August 09, 2008Dogs have different personalities. It really depends on the breed or the dog’s family history. From being a puppy to an adult dog, they are accompanied by their human masters. The dog’s everyday routine is usually dependent on their master’s lifestyle.    However, some dogs experience anxiety that almost comes instantly when they are left alone.  If they are left alone, these dogs can become destructive, which is their means of expressing frustration or loneliness.  This is called separation anxiety in dogs.  Dogs can become restless and bored, and if they see that their master is not around, they may go out to chew on anything that they can get their paws on – from slippers, to furniture, to other objects found in the house.

Chewing on certain objects that has the master’s smell (socks, shoe, the sofa, or even the door) is one of the many symptoms of separation anxiety in dogs. Other symptoms to watch out for are continuous barking, uncontrolled “pooping”, and various ways to get master’s attention.    Probable causes for such behavior often include dogs that were not properly socialized or dogs that have been living in different homes. With this in mind, owners should take a second look at their dogs and see if they exhibit such behavior. This will give them an idea if their dog might be suffering from separation anxiety.

Dealing with separation anxiety in dogs can be serious if not threatening for your carpet or sofa. Begin with a no “goodbye” technique.  Owners should not give their dogs any hugs before they leave the home.   This will only make the dog long for more attention from the owner. Another tip would be to leave some toys or goodies that will help your dog consume its time and take its attention away from its anxiety.

Great Tips For Getting Your Dog Toilet Trained

123RF-17245805_sOne of the toughest jobs that a family faces when a new puppy comes home is getting the dog housebroken. Here are some tips that will help:

When to House Train

A dog can be toilet trained at any age, but the best age to begin is between eight and twelve weeks old. If you set up a housebreaking routine as soon as you bring your puppy home, before long he will get the idea of where to do his business. A crate is a great tool for toilet training a puppy. It keeps him confined when there is no supervision and most dogs learn quickly that if they make it in their crate they will have to sit in it. Most dogs are fairly hygienic and won’t enjoy having to sit in dog doody or urine.

Keep Your Eyes Peeled

Keeping a close eye on your puppy is a key factor in getting him properly housetrained. Whenever you see that he is sniffing, circling or beginning to squat, immediately take him outside to the place where you want him to go and see if he eliminates. If he does, praise him lavishly. A good idea is to have a cue, such as “hurry up” so that your puppy knows what you want him to do. When he is going to the bathroom repeat the cue and then give your dog lots of praise for a job well done. It is better to take the dog out and nothing happens then to take a chance of an accident happening.

Have a Schedule

Feeding, watering and walking your dog on a regular schedule will make housebreaking that much easier. Puppies are like children and they thrive on a routine. Try and take the dog out around the same time every day so they will be able to adjust their bodily functions. The first thing you should do in the morning is take the puppy from the crate and don’t let his feet touch the ground. Bring him to the place where you want him to go, give the cue, and praise upon a successful completion. Take your puppy out at least every two hours, after eating or drinking and especially after play. Before you know it, your puppy will be letting you know it is time to go out and do his business.

Don’t Let the Puppy Roam

Letting your puppy roam around the house is a sure fire way to have accidents. If you have decided you don’t want to use a crate, and even if you do use one, confining the dog to certain areas of the house can make housetraining easier for everyone. It is difficult to keep track of a puppy when he has the run of the house, but if you gate him in the kitchen, he will still be able to be part of the action and can be better supervised in case of an accident.

Don’t Get Discouraged

There will be times when you first begin housetraining that you feel your pup is just not getting it. He may occasionally have accidents in the house. There is no need to be discouraged. If you stick to your routine, keep a good eye on the dog and make frequent outings to his outdoor bathroom, in no time your puppy will be housebroken. Another good idea is to use the same door all the time when you are taking him out so that when he has to go, he will scratch on the door to be let out. Once this happens, you can say “Hurray!” and know that your puppy is beginning to understand that going to the bathroom in the house is a no-no.